Twitter Facebook Vimeo

Helping New Brunswickers Know the Law

What's New

Booklet on family law for immigrants officially launched in five languages

Multicultural agencies and families now have access to new tools on the subject of family law, thanks to the Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick (PLEIS-NB). A new booklet entitled Family Law Matters for Immigrants was officially launched today.

“For various reasons, newcomers to Canada may not completely understand their rights when it comes to separation and divorce,” said Justice and Public Safety Minister Denis Landry. “Those rights are very similar to those of Canadian-born residents. This publication will assist greatly in helping immigrants navigate New Brunswick’s family justice system when needed. I am particularly proud that this information is available in five languages, reflecting the cultural diversity of our province.”

The brochure is available in both official languages as well as ArabicKorean and Mandarin. It covers a variety of topics on family law as they relate to new Canadians, including custody, access, support and marital property issues. It also includes a section on family violence and provides referrals to support services and other resources.

“We are pleased to say that the booklet goes a long way in addressing some common misconceptions about the legal system,” said Deborah Doherty, executive director of PLEIS-NB. “For example, we learned that many immigrants were not aware of the rights of common-law partners. Some even thought that living together without being married was illegal.” 

The Multicultural Association of Fredericton also partnered in the development of the publication by arranging consultations for PLEIS-NB staff with immigrants and immigrant serving agencies. The input from these consultations, along with the advice of legal reviewers, ensured the accuracy and tone of the new resource. The publication was made possible with funding from Justice Canada’s Supporting Families Fund, as well as support from the New Brunswick’s Department of Justice and Public Safety.

Family Law Matters for Immigrants is now available at New Brunswick libraries, multicultural associations, immigrant serving agencies and others who support newcomers. It is also available on Family Law NB website.

 From left: Souzane Mouhawej, Arabic translator; Crestina Matta, Arabic translator;
Deborah Doherty, executive director of the PLEIS-NB;
Justice and Public Safety Minister Denis Landry; Sungmi Song, Korean translator;
Lingyun Hao, Mandarin translator;
and Jennifer Weston, legal researcher with the PLEIS-NB.